Journal Watch - Chronic Kidney Disease

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  1. Bioartificial kidney challenges

    When Shuvo Roy is an author on a bioartificial kidney review paper, you know it is worth reading. Cell-based therapies are an approach to duplicate all of the functions of a healthy kidney, including hormone production. But, where the cells come from, organ scaffolding, and immune response remain challenges even in animals—let alone humans.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  2. Are portable or wearable kidney devices on the horizon?

    Nanotechnology may allow for a new generation of wearable and portable devices to treat kidney failure. Some are now in large animal and human trials. A new day may be coming.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  3. Online educational modules for professionals boost home therapies

    A 3-module package of web-based e-learning about home dialysis was developed and tested on 88 undergraduate health professionals in Australia. Matching pre- and post-educational attitudes revealed clear knowledge deficits at the start, and significant improvement (p<0.001) afterward.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/09/2014)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  4. US dialysis education in this study was a FAIL—especially for seniors

    In a study of 99 US dialysis consumers, education about options was poor regardless of age—but was far worse in those over age 65. Significantly fewer older people said the doctor explained the cause of their kidney failure, the impact dialysis would have on their daily lives, or the life-long need for dialysis, and most felt that the choice of treatment was made by the doctor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/07/2014)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  5. Ultrathin silicon membranes for wearable dialysis.

    A wearable artificial kidney will need a membrane efficient enough to remove a lot of toxins in a small device. This article explains the technical details of porous nanocrystalline silicon made into chips. Pore size can be controlled to keep albumin in but let middle molecules out, like a healthy kidney. Special coatings that repel water keep proteins from adhering to the membrane.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/10/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. The future of dialysis: Mini dialyzers with nanopores

    The smaller the dialzer, the more portable dialysis can become. Ultrathin silicon membranes have now been tried in mini dialyzers with nanopores. Coating the membrane with polyethylene glycol helps reduce activation of white blood cells without blocking the tiny pores.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/02/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. Wearable and implantable artificial kidneys

    Thrice weekly in-center HD for 4 hours or less is a paradigm that must change to improve patient outcomes. But longer and/or more frequent treatments are not practically available to the total dialysis population. Thus, radical new approaches are needed—like wearable devices or implantable ones.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  8. Predialysis patient education boosts use of PD

    In a 4-year period, 227 patients attended a CKD education program. Compared to a control group who did not attend, the educated patients were almost twice as likely to choose PD (54.3% vs. 28%).

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  9. Informed decision-making about dialysis options

    Among 99 dialysis patients from 15 clinics in North Carolina, 67% said they felt like they had no choice about their modality, and about a third felt that the choice had already been made by their doctor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. Phosphate is a blood vessel toxin

    If blood phosphate levels are too high, the blood vessels can turn to stone—even in children. Heart damage from high phosphate levels can begin in pre-dialysis CKD. "Keeping serum P levels in the normal range reduces cardiovascular risk and mortality," say the authors. [Editor's note: nocturnal hemodialysis removes the most phosphate of any dialysis option.]

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/24/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease