Journal Watch - Australia

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  1. ACTIVE trial of extended dialysis described

    A Clinical Trial of IntensiVE (ACTIVE) Dialysis is a randomized trial of extended (24+ hours) or standard (12-18 hours) of weekly HD for 12 months, looking at quality of life, left ventricular mass, and safety. The study has 200 participants from Australia, China, Canada, and New Zealand, meeting the planned recruitment target. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00649298).

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

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  2. Biocompatible PD fluids are cost-effective (in capitated systems…)

    In Australia, where the cost of hospitalization is of concern to the National Healthcare System, one group of PD patients was given biocompatible PD fluid, while a control group received standard PD fluid. After 2 years, the more costly biocompatible fluid created significant cost savings due to reduced peritonitis and hospital stays.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

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  3. Short-term transfer from PD to HD was not harmful

    Peritonitis may require a switch to HD for a while. Does this affect patient or technique survival? No, finds an Australian study that looked at 8 years of people new to PD and matched PD-to-HD-and-back switchers to those who stayed just on PD or HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

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  4. Web e-learning boosts home dialysis knowledge in Australia

    A 3-module e-learning package was developed for a “Home First” project in Australia and tested on 88 undergraduate health professionals. The students knew little about home dialysis before using the modules, and improved significantly afterward.

    Read the abstract » | (added 06/05/2014)

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  5. Online educational modules for professionals boost home therapies

    A 3-module package of web-based e-learning about home dialysis was developed and tested on 88 undergraduate health professionals in Australia. Matching pre- and post-educational attitudes revealed clear knowledge deficits at the start, and significant improvement (p<0.001) afterward.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/09/2014)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. Is there a new way to prevent PD infections? Sorry, honey

    Honey has a long history of helping to heal wounds—with no risk of antibiotic resistance. But, a recent trial of the sweet stuff in PD exit site infections did not show a benefit. Researchers asked 186 patients from 26 clinics in Australia and New Zealand to put purified honey on their exit sites, while a control group (185 people) used standard care (or mupirocin if they carried S aureus). The time to first infection was about the same in both groups.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/06/2013)

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  7. Risks of biocompatible PD solution

    Sugar (dextrose) in PD solution helps remove water from the blood—at a cost. Advanced glycation endpoints (AGEs) formed when the solution is made can harm the peritoneum over time. It would seem to make sense more biocompatible (like the human body) solutions would be better and safer. Some studies have found this, but a new look in the ANZDATA registry of all PD patients from Australia/New Zealand from January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 did not. Use of biocompatible PD solution was linked with significantly more (49% more) peritonitis, and far less time to a first bout of the infection.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/02/2013)

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  8. Icodextrin metaanalysis – no impact on patient survival

    Australian researchers analyzed 11 studies of icodextrin vs. glucose PD fluid (1222 patients). Icodextrin did help reduce fluid overload without harming residual kidney function. But, it did not help reduce peritonitis, technique failure, or other adverse events. And, patients who used icodextrin did not live any longer.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/29/2013)

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  9. New from Australia: Outcomes of extended HD (mainly done at home)

    In a series of 286 people doing extended HD, 96% received their treatments at home, and 77% did them at night. Survival was 98% at 1 year, 92% at 3 years, and 83% at 5 years.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

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  10. Mortality patterns in PD & home HD differ from standard in-center HD

    In the Australian dialysis database (ANZDATA), 4,298 deaths on PD and 10,338 on HD were analyzed for patterns. Patients who did PD, home HD, or in-center HD more than 3 days per week were equally likely to die on any day of the week. Not so for standard in-center HD patients: they were significantly more likely to die from heart-related reasons on Monday, after the 2-day no-treatment weekend.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

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