Journal Watch - Australia

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  1. Community house home hemodialysis in Australia and New Zealand

    Not everyone who wants to dialyze at home is able to. In Australia and New Zealand unstaffed, non-medical community homes fill a gap to make "home" treatments possible. This observational study compared mortality among 113 community home dialyzers to 5,591 people on PD, 1,532 on home HD, and 5,647 on in-center HD. Community house HD was safe and effective.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

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  2. Home HD for obese patients

    In Australia, a 215 Kg man has successfully dialyzed at home for 8 years, after training by a program that has trained 23 obese (BMI >30) people to date. Home HD is a cost effective option with good outcomes in this group.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/27/2012)

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  3. Home HD may be a good fit for obese patients

    An Australian clinic has successfully trained 23 obese people (BMI >30) to do home HD between 2001 and 2009. Patients stayed on the treatment for an average of 43.7 months.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/25/2012)

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  4. Outcomes of extended-hours HD (mainly at home)

    Among 286 people in Australia who did 24 hours or more of HD per week (96% at home), survival was 98% for 1 year, 92% for 3 years, and 83% for 5 years. Technique survival was 90% for 1 year, 77% for 3 years, and 68% for 5 years. This study did find higher rates of access problems with more frequent HD, but there was no control group.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/25/2012)

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  5. Longer or more-frequent HD normalizes mortality patterns

    It has long been known that those on PD have an equal chance of dying on any day of the week—while standard in-center HD are much more likely to die on a Monday (or Tuesday with Tue-Thu-Sat treatments). A new study looking at 14,636 Australian registry deaths found that those who got more than 3 standard in-center treatments per week or did home HD were no more likely to die on a Monday (or Tuesday) than any other day.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/25/2012)

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  6. Green dialysis: using solar power for HD

    Our own Dr. John Agar and other researchers from Australia report on their experience using the sun to power a dialysis clinic and reduce electricity costs by 76.5% In the second and third decades, the new system will pay for itself and contribute power to the grid.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/26/2012)

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  7. Alternate night nocturnal HD in Australia

    Every other night nocturnal HD is a popular option in Australia. Patients who use this option have lower phosphorus levels and better volume control and well-being—at about the same cost as standard in-center HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

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  8. More home HD in Australia and New Zealand—because doctors believe in it

    In contrast to the rest of the world, Australia and New Zealand have an average of 12.9% of patients using home HD. Why? Because nephrologists, nurses, and funding agencies hold strong beliefs in the clinical and economic benefits of this option.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

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  9. Alternate-night HD improves bone minerals & blood pressure

    Among 63 people in Australia who switched from standard HD to alternate-night HD, bone mineral balance and blood pressure improved after 18–24 months. Left ventricular mass did not improve, but remained stable.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/28/2011)

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  10. Home HD and mortality risk in Australia and New Zealand

    Researchers analyzed data from 26,016 patients in the ANZDATA registry (856,007 patient-months) to see if home HD helped people live longer. Compared to standard in-center HD, those on standard (3x/week), more-frequent, or nocturnal home HD were about twice as likely to survive.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/25/2011)

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