Journal Watch

  1. New resource for intraperitoneal drug delivery

    On PD, it's not hard to inject a drug into the PD bag so it goes into the peritoneum. Which drugs are safest and most effective this way? A new article tells you the scoop.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  2. Pain meds may one day protect the peritoneum

    COX-2 inhibitors fight pain and inflammation. A new study in mice has found that COX-2 drugs were able to reduce fibrosis and damage to the peritoneum caused by PD fluid. This finding may one day help people to do PD longer.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  3. Hope for peritoneal fibrosis?

    Over time, the peritoneum can become fibrous and thickened, and less able to filter the blood during PD. A new study in rats suggests that erythropoietin (EPO) may help. Rats treated with EPO had less fibrosis. Down the road, perhaps this finding will help people.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. Female sexual function better on PD than standard in-center HD

    If you're a woman, a new study finds that a transplant is the best way to restore your sexual function to normal levels. But PD did a much better job than standard HD—and the study didn't look at daily or nocturnal HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  5. Need a bone density test on PD? Be sure you're empty

    A new study has found that having fluid in your belly when you have a bone density test (called DXA) can change the results.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  6. PKD is not a barrier to successful PD

    In a study that compared 56 people with polycystic kidney disease on PD to 56 non-diabetic people with small kidneys on PD, there were no differences between the two groups after 37 months.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  7. Nocturnal HD protects blood vessels

    Damage to smooth muscle cells may be one reason why people on standard in-center HD tend to have more clogged and calcified arteries. In 15 patients studied before and after switching from standard HD to nocturnal HD, there was better smooth muscle growth and less cell death on nocturnal. (Blood pressure, PTH levels, and phosphorus levels improved, too.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  8. Longer survival on PD with ACE-inhibitors or ARBs

    Even if blood pressure is normal, taking blood pressure pills in the ACE-inhibitor or ARB class was linked with much better survival in a new study. Researchers studied 306 new PD users from 2001 to 2005. Even adjusting for age, blood pressure, and other illnesses, those who took the BP pills had a 62% lower risk of death.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  9. Matching home dialysis to lifestyle

    A "continuum home program concept" described in a new article would help people with kidney failure continue their lifestyles with dialysis—rather than disrupt them with treatment. The aim is for a continuous flow of services from education to treatment choice, dialysis access, and option changes when needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. PD: Less cancer risk than standard HD

    DNA damage that can lead to cancer can occur in kidney failure, as the buildup of toxins stresses the body. A new study looked at genetic damage in 20 people on standard in-center HD, 20 on PD matched for gender and age, and 40 controls. Cheek swabs were used to look for DNA damage. Creatinine levels, smoking, alcohol use, age, income, and length of time on dialysis were also examined. The only factor that mattered was length of time on standard HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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