Journal Watch

  • Rapid fluid removal during HD linked with heart damage and death

    Short, fast, thrice weekly treatments are hard on the heart. Among 1,846 people on standard HD, those whose fluid removal was the slowest and most gentle were most likely to survive. Rates of fluid removal lower than 10 milliliters per hour per kilo were safest.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • 15+ hours/week of short daily home HD boosts survival

    Folks on standard HD have a 50% greater chance of dying on the day after the 2-day no-treatment weekend. Not so with short daily HD! A new study by Kjellstrand et al also finds that just being home boosted survival by 50%, and getting 15+ hours of treatment helped by 16%. Kt/V had no relationship with survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • High transporters live just as long on cycler PD

    In a study that followed 117 people who started PD in Korea, those who were older, or had diabetes or heart disease had poorer survival. But being a high transporter (wastes move quickly through the peritoneum but water removal is poor) did not reduce survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Vitamin E-coated dialyzers may reduce inflammation

    One cause of heart disease is a build-up of "free radicals" in the blood. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, which mops up free radicals. In Japan, Vitamin E-coated dialyzors have been linked with a need for less heparin and less anemia. Immune function seems better, too. Perhaps these will one day come to the U.S.?

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • NSF from gadolinium contrast dye is very rare

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a life-threatening problem that has been linked to gadolinium MRI contrast dye in people with kidney problems. The good news is that the rate of NSF is very low—just 1.6% even among those who did receive gadolinium.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Kidney pros would choose home dialysis

    A survey of kidney professionals done by Satellite Healthcare found that more than 90% would choose a home treatment if their kidneys failed—about half choosing PD and half choosing some type of home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Dialyzors prefer buttonholes

    A new study of standard in-center HD dialyzors who have used the buttonhole technique for a year found that satisfaction averaged 8.5 (out of 10); 96% said they would recommend it; and 83% said it was easier for the nurses. (Of course, we'd far rather see folks putting in their own needles!)

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • What you don't know CAN hurt you!

    Health literacy means how well you understand and can use medical info to help yourself. In a new study of 480 folks on HD, those whose health literacy was highest lived longest—even adjusting for age, sex, race, and diabetes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Nurse education after unplanned dialysis starts increases home treatments

    Each year, about half of those who start dialysis had little or no time to prepare. In a new study of 176 Canadians, assigning a nurse to teach new dialyzors increased the use of PD, home HD, and even transplant.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • November 2006 Kidney International supplement focuses on PD

    Is survival better on PD or HD? What factors predict PD success? What are best practices in PD catheter placement? Does use of biocompatible PD solution reduce peritonitis? Learn the answers to these and many other key PD questions in the November 2006 supplement of KI. (For kidney professionals who don't subscribe to Kidney International, we've compiled the links to all of the abstracts from the special supplement on PD (November 2006). You can find them below.

    Note to dialyzors: Kidney International is a medical journal for professionals. Feel free to read the abstracts—and please write and let us know if there is information you think we should focus on for a future "Life@Home" article. We'd love to hear from you!

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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