Journal Watch

  • On PD, higher uric acid levels predict faster loss of kidney function

    Keeping as much of your kidney function as you can is a plus on PD or HD. A new study from Korea has found that people on PD whose levels of uric acid were higher had a faster decline in their kidney function. Those with higher blood pressure tended to have higher uric acid levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Antibiotic ointment aids Buttonhole safety

    The only downside of the Buttonhole technique for dialysis needles has been a higher risk of infection. That risk can be reduced, finds a new study. No patient who put mupirocin (Bactroban®) ointment on Buttonholes after treatment got an infection.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Better blood pressure control with short daily HD

    In a new study of 12 patients switched from standard to daily HD, blood pressure was less variable on daily treatments—and drops during treatment were significantly reduced. (These changes may help explain the better survival on this treatment.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • PKD is not a barrier to successful PD

    In a study that compared 56 people with polycystic kidney disease on PD to 56 non-diabetic people with small kidneys on PD, there were no differences between the two groups after 37 months.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Need an MRI? Ask for NAC + bicarb

    MRI contrast dye can damage kidneys. A new meta-analysis (study of studies) has found that two approaches are better than one in preventing this damage. N-acetylcystein (NAC, or Mucomyst®) plus bicarbonate-based IV fluid reduced the risk of damage by 35%. The authors say this combo treatment should be used for all high-risk patients—including those with CKD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • CKD education saves lives

    A new study from Taiwan found that people who got CKD education were about 3 times less likely to need dialysis during the study period (about a year), and more than 5 times more likely to live than a control group that did not receive the education.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease