Journal Watch - Chronic Kidney Disease

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  1. Wearable and implantable kidney devices

    The current standard in-center paradigm needs to change, say the authors of this review. Radically new approaches are needed to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Two such approaches on the horizon are wearable and implantable devices.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  2. Can more fluid removal mean needing less toxin removal?

    Makers of a wearable ultrafiltration (UF; water removal) device wanted to know if daily UF could be a way to cut back on the need for dialysis toxin removal. For 4 weeks, 13 in-center patients had 4 days a week of UF plus 2 days a week of HD. Then they did 4 weeks of standard, 3x week HD. Daily UF lowered blood pressure and weight gain between treatments significantly—while Kt/V rose.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  3. When choosing a treatment option, lifestyle is what matters to patients

    A metaanalysis found 16 studies of how people with late-stage CKD choose what type of dialysis to do. Common elements included the life-or-death nature of ESRD; minimal intrusion of treatment into quality of life, autonomy, values, and sense of self; and making informed choices.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  4. Phosphate is a blood vessel toxin

    High levels of phosphorus in the blood is linked with blood vessel calcification, thickened blood vessel walls, arterial stiffness, and heart damage—and may even cause premature aging.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  5. Metaanalysis: Later dialysis start is better for HD

    Starting dialysis at a lower GFR allows more time for access placement and options education. But the U.S. trend has been to start earlier. A new metaanalysis of 17 studies found that starting dialysis at a higher GFR was linked with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality—in HD, but not PD. The mortality risk was lower when GFR was calculated than when it was estimated.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/16/2012)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. Pregnancy and more dialysis

    In general, pregnancy is uncommon in women with ESRD. But more dialysis seems to improve pregnancy outcomes. This review article addresses fertility issues, pregnancy, and suggestions for how to manage dialysis in pregnant women.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. Adsorptive column removes B2m

    Too-high levels of B2m cause amyloidosis in people on dialysis, with joint and bone pain. In Japan, people dialyzed using the Lixelle S-15 adsorptive column had significantly less B2m in their blood after a year of 3x/week treatments. They were also stronger and had less joint pain.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/28/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  8. Implantable artificial kidney—progress

    Three key bits of technology are needed to make an implantable artificial kidney possible: high efficiency membranes to remove water, a way to keep blood from clotting, and a way to mimic the selective action of kidney cells for removing wastes. Progress is occurring in each area.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/27/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  9. Patients educated about options are more likely to choose home

    A new UK study surveyed 118 people with CKD who were not yet on dialysis. Those who were educated about their options were much more likely to plan for home treatment. The most important factor in their choice: fit of a treatment option with the preferred lifestyle.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. Mucomyst does not prevent nephrogenic systemic sclerosis

    A new study randomized 2,308 people at risk for kidney injury from contrast dye into two groups. One group was given acetylcysteine (Mucomyst®) by mouth, a strong antioxidant. The other group was given a placebo. Both groups had the same rate of kidney injury and need for dialysis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease