Journal Watch - Hemodialysis

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  1. Iron-based Binder Safe and Effective in PD

    A study conducted with 84 PD patients compared sucroferric oxyhydroxide (n=56) to sevelamer (n=28). After a year, both groups had serum phosphate levels within the target range. The iron-based binder required fewer pills per day and resulted in fewer adverse events. Read the abstract.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/13/2017)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal Dialysis; Phosphate Binder, Sevelamer Carbonate, Sucroferric Oxyhydroxide, Hemodialysis

  2. In-center nocturnal HD boosts lean body mass

    Among 56 adults followed for a year, those who were randomly assigned to nocturnal in-center HD vs. standard treatments had higher, more stable interdialytic weights. The pattern of toxin removal suggests that the result is due to increases in lean body mass.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  3. HD frequency and protein-bound solutes

    Does more frequent HD do a better job of removing protein-bound solutes from the gut that are more toxic than urea? No, finds a new analysis of results from the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) trials.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  4. Short daily HD in pediatrics

    Dividing 12 hours of in-center HD into 5 weekly treatments instead of 3 was feasible and beneficial to blood pressure control in adolescents in a new crossover study. However, not surprisingly, reimbursement and time demands were challenging. (Editorial note: home treatments would allow more flexibility for school.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. Ultrafiltration: Speed Kills

    Among 190 people on HD, those whose ultrafiltration (fluid removal) rate was higher than the median (just 6.8 mL/Kg/h) were less likely to survive than those who were at or below the median. Most participants did not have residual kidney function.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/12/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  6. In-center Nocturnal HD Beats Standard HD

    An analysis of 21 published studies (n=1,165 in-center nocturnal patients and 15,865 standard in-center HD patients) found better BP, higher Hgb, and lower serum phosphate levels in those who dialyzed longer.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/12/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  7. Frequent HD in Children

    Does 5x/week in-center HD benefit children more than 3x/week treatments? A multicenter pilot followed 8 children with a median age of 16.7 years. Among the 6 patients who completed two study periods, 5 had a sustained 10% or more decrease in systolic BP or antihypertensives during the more frequent treatments. Reimbursement and time burdens are challenges.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/12/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  8. PD vs. Standard HD for People with Cirrhosis

    For cirrhotic people with kidney failure, data abstraction from the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Study between 2005 and 2012 compared outcomes with PD and standard in-center HD. In-hospital mortality for those with ascites was significantly less with PD. In addition, PD hospital stays were shorter and costs were lower. Yet, just 1.7% of the sample was using PD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/12/2017)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  9. Pregnancy on PD—at 42: It’s Not Impossible

    While research shows that the chance for a pregnant woman on dialysis to have a healthy baby seems to be best with 36+ hours of HD per week, a 42-year old Malaysian woman had a full-term baby with no change to her CAPD prescription.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/12/2017)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  10. Results of a Metaanalysis of Nocturnal vs. Standard HD

    Researchers who looked at 28 studies of 22,508 patients found a mixed bag: comparable side effects and mortality between nocturnal and standard HD, less hospitalization with standard HD—but better heart health and physical quality of life with nocturnal HD, with fewer blood pressure medicines needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis