Journal Watch - Hemodialysis

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  1. Results of a Metaanalysis of Nocturnal vs. Standard HD

    Researchers who looked at 28 studies of 22,508 patients found a mixed bag: comparable side effects and mortality between nocturnal and standard HD, less hospitalization with standard HD—but better heart health and physical quality of life with nocturnal HD, with fewer blood pressure medicines needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  2. And, Again: More HD Improves Quality of Life

    Data from the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) trials found that those who were randomized to frequent or nocturnal HD reported outcomes that included better results on a “feeling thermometer,” better general health, and shorter recovery time than for standard in-center HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  3. Home HD: Cost-effective With Better Outcomes Than In-center

    A review of the patient-centered and economic impacts of home HD that included studies between 2000 and 2016 found better quality of life, flexibility, employment potential, and survival vs. hospital HD. Minority and low-income patients still have less access than others, which compounds their already-poor health outcomes. The authors found that home HD is cost-effective and the use of this option should be increased.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  4. Does Frequent HD Boost Quality of Life? NO

    A new Canadian study randomized 200 patients to standard in-center HD (12-15 hours/wk; maximum of 18 hours) or extended HD (>24 hours/wk) for a year. Extended HD reduced phosphate and potassium levels and boosted Hgb, and patients took fewer BP meds and phosphate binders. However, health-related quality of life scores did not differ significantly between the groups.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/08/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. Does Frequent HD Boost Quality of Life? YES

    As with nearly every other study, a new paper from the Frequent Hemodialysis Network trial looked at HRQOL among patients randomized to conventional vs. 6x/week HD (N=245) or 6x/week nocturnal vs. conventional home HD (N=87). After one year, patients who dialyzed more often had higher HRQOL than those on standard HD—and shorter recovery after each treatment.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/08/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  6. Medicare Payment for Daily Home HD Varies Geographically

    According to Medicare claims data for in-center HD and home HD from 2009-2012, there were persistent variations in the home HD treatment claims paid by different Medicare contractors. Fortunately, these differences did not seem to affect whether clinics offered home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/08/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  7. More Hospital Readmissions with PD Than In-Center HD

    Those on PD have fewer routine clinic visits than those on standard in-center HD. This may help explain why a 10-year study of hospital discharges among 28,026 dialyzors in Canada found that 30-day readmission rates in PD patients were higher (7.1) than for matched patients doing standard in-center HD (6.0). Better care transitions may help.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/08/2017)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  8. Low Molecular Weight Heparin Use in Nocturnal HD

    Since people sleep during nocturnal HD, a form of heparin with a longer half-life is needed to keep blood from clotting. Enter low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). A study in Hong Kong* randomized 12 nocturnal HD patients to receive nadroparin or unfractioned heparin for a week—and then switch. The researchers concluded that LMWH was safe and effective, though if treatments are done each night, it is important to monitor for build up of the heparin in the blood.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/09/2017)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  9. NxStage Outcomes in France and Belgium

    Among 62 patients from 31 centers in France and Belgium, albumin and bicarbonate levels improved significantly, and technique survival was 75% at one year (most who stopped received transplants). Despite the low volume of dialysate, the rsearchers concluded that dialysis adequacy was acceptable.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/09/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. Systematic Review of Pregnancy on HD

    A new review summarizes 101 full papers and 25 abstracts and addresses the promise of successful pregnancy if enough HD is given.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/10/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis