Journal Watch - 2011

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  1. Home dialysis boosts patient employment in Finland

    A new study looked at employment results among 2,637 people ages 15 to 64 on dialysis or with kidney transplants in Finland. While just 19% of those on standard in-center HD were working, 39% of those on home HD, 40% of those with working transplants, and 44% on cycler PD were employed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/27/2011)

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  2. Antioxidant improves residual kidney function in PD

    Four weeks of twice-daily oral N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, significantly increased residual kidney function of people on PD in a small study (n=10).

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/27/2011)

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  3. A new look at dialysis treatment length

    There is increasing proof that dialysis treatments shorter than 4 hours are not long enough. A new paper reviews the literature knowing what we know now—and concludes that most people should get at least 4 hours per treatment.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

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  4. U.S. barriers to home dialysis treatments

    Home dialysis is underused in the U.S., and a committee of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis has looked at why that may be. The group organized the barriers into three groups: educational, government/regulatory, and dialysis practice, and is looking at strategies to address each.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

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  5. Patients educated about options are more likely to choose home

    A new UK study surveyed 118 people with CKD who were not yet on dialysis. Those who were educated about their options were much more likely to plan for home treatment. The most important factor in their choice: fit of a treatment option with the preferred lifestyle.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. Mucomyst does not prevent nephrogenic systemic sclerosis

    A new study randomized 2,308 people at risk for kidney injury from contrast dye into two groups. One group was given acetylcysteine (Mucomyst®) by mouth, a strong antioxidant. The other group was given a placebo. Both groups had the same rate of kidney injury and need for dialysis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. PD as a treatment for severe heart failure

    In a small study, people whose CKD had not yet caused kidney failure were helped by peritoneal dialysis. After 2 months, the 19 study participants lost water weight, breathed easier, could sleep lying flat, and had no hospital stays for fluid overload.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  8. Basing dialysis dose on REAL toxins

    Dialysis "adequacy" is based on removing urea—a waste that is not all that toxic. A new article points out that finding and choosing wastes that truly are toxic could change the way we measure dialysis for the better.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

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  9. Using L-carnitine instead of sugar for PD fluid

    Over time, sugar can harm the peritoneal membrane so it can't be used for PD. L-carnitine is a substance the body needs for energy. In a new rat study, PD fluid with L-carnitine removed as much—or more—water and wastes as sugar-based fluid. The new fluid was well tolerated and did not damage the peritoneum.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/29/2011)

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  10. Home HD and mortality risk in Australia and New Zealand

    Researchers analyzed data from 26,016 patients in the ANZDATA registry (856,007 patient-months) to see if home HD helped people live longer. Compared to standard in-center HD, those on standard (3x/week), more-frequent, or nocturnal home HD were about twice as likely to survive.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/25/2011)

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