Journal Watch - 2011

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  1. Simpler pill regimen needed by those using nocturnal home HD

    Among 35 people who switched from standard in-center HD to nocturnal home HD, the number of pills per day did not drop—but the regimen was much simplified—and health-related quality of life was significantly improved.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  2. Benefits of switching from 3x/week in-center HD to 6x/week home HD

    Among 11 people who switched treatments, blood pressure dropped, hemoglobin levels rose (with lower ESA doses), the calcium-phosphorus product dropped (with no change in binder doses), and BMI and serum albumin levels went up. We are so not surprised!

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  3. AAKP's study of patient satisfaction with kidney education and dialysis (hint: not so good)

    977 patients completed a 46-item survey asking about satisfaction with current treatment for kidney failure and education on a scale of 1–10 (with 1 low). Standard in-center HD rated 4.5. PD rated 5.2, home HD was 5.5, and transplant was 6.1. About 31% of participants felt the treatment options were not equally and fairly presented, and 32% had not been educated about home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  4. Better fluid removal with icodextrin PD fluid - Meta-analysis

    A new study of 9 randomized controlled trials has found that people using icodextrin removed much more water than those using glucose based fluid—with no change in residual kidney function or increase in peritonitis or death. Rash was more common in those using icodextrin.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  5. PD (vs. in-center HD) and less bad breath

    After 3 months on PD, 42 people in a new study had more saliva—and less bad breath.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  6. PD doesn't zap your heart

    "Myocardial stunning" occurs in HD due to brief periods of not enough blood flow to the heart muscle. Over time, as this happens over and over, it can cause heart damage. In a small study (just 10 people') looking at heart muscles, PD exchanges did not reduce blood flow to the heart—so, no stunning occurred.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  7. Fungal peritonitis (FP)? Take catheter out sooner rather than later

    FP is a rare but serious problem on PD—and it can be lethal. A new study of 94 cases found that survival was nearly 3 times better when the infected catheter was removed within 24 hours of diagnosis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  8. Future of the artificial kidney

    Learn the latest on futuristic dialysis with wearable and miniaturized devices!

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  9. Naturally higher red blood cell counts do NOT reduce survival

    It never made sense to us that a "normal" hemoglobin level would somehow become harmful in kidney failure. And, in fact, it's not the Hgb itself that causes harm. A new DOPPS study of 545 people on dialysis whose Hgbs were normal without ESA drugs found no difference in survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. TPA reduces HD catheter infections by 50%

    Heparin is put into HD catheters after each use to prevent blood clots. Researchers replaced it with a clot-busting drug used for strokes—TPA—at one treatment per week. The new routine reduced catheter infections. (Hmmm. Is heparin sterile? What if TPA was used at ALL HD treatments?)

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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