Journal Watch

  1. C-reactive protein may help identify those at greater risk of post-peritonitis problems

    People with higher CRP levels during and after peritonitis were at higher risk for relapse, a switch to HD, or death than those with lower levels, found a study in the Feb. 14 issue of Kidney International. CRP levels may be a useful screening tool.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  2. Author suggests PD for disaster preparedness

    A new article in this month's Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease suggests that PD is a good option for people whose dialysis lives are disrupted by hurricanes or other natural disasters. Home dialysis with PD, portable HD, or HD machines that do their own water treatment can help make dialyzors more self-sufficient in any emergency—from a storm to a flu epidemic. It's something to think about...

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  3. CAPD and CCPD come out even in meta-analysis

    A Cochrane database review looked at studies comparing CAPD and CCPD for peritonitis, hernias, switching to HD, fluid leaks, hospital stays, and death—and found no significant differences between them. CCPD may have some pluses in terms of schedule for younger, working patients.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. Low serum albumin is a risk factor for peritonitis in PD patients

    On PD? Be sure to eat enough protein. A new study looked at whether conventional PD solutions were linked to more or less peritonitis than Nutrineal or Extraneal. There were no significant differences between them—but patients with serum albumin levels less than 3 g/dL were at significantly higher risk.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  5. Make your own PD fluid?

    Okay, it's a long way off. But what if you could make pure water at home for PD, instead of having to ship bags of PD fluid across the country? Think of the space you'd save. Researchers in Italy used a dialyzer to purify used PD fluid and create pure water.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  6. Peritoneal cell transplants—a future option for PD?

    Over time, glucose-based PD fluid can cause fibrosis and blood vessel changes to the peritoneal membrane, making PD impossible. But what if you could transplant the cells lining the peritoneum and grow a new layer from your own tissue? Could PD continue? Researchers are looking into this intriguing possibility.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  7. Inflammation helps explain EPO resistance on PD

    Sometimes high doses of EPO are needed to reach a target hemoglobin. Why? A new study found that on PD, inflammation (measured by c-reactive protein), too-low levels of serum albumin, and abnormal levels of PTH were some of the factors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  8. On PD and need a colonoscopy? Ask for antibiotics first

    A new study of 77 people on PD who had 97 colonoscopies found that peritonitis is much less likely when antibiotics are taken before it was done. Even in those who did get peritonitis, antibiotic treatment worked.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  9. Pipeline PD technology: Vincenza wearable artificial kidney minicycler

    What if instead of exchanging bags of fluid for CAPD, you put in one fresh bag each morning, then wore a small pump to filter and regenerate it over and over? You'd save time—and use a lot less fluid. This system, invented by Dr. Claudio Ronco and associates in Italy, is being tested right now.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  10. Access-challenged people on HD have a new HeRO

    Running out of vascular access sites is no laughing matter. A new fully-implantable dialysis catheter helps solve the infection risk that occurs when a catheter goes through the skin and into a central vein. In a new study of 36 people, the Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) had infection rates similar to grafts.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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