Journal Watch

  1. Predicting blood vessel calcification in PD

    In a study of 231 PD patients, those whose C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 levels were higher had a higher risk of blood vessel calcification and heart problems than those with lower levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  2. How long should PD catheters be embedded before use?

    A study of 5,624 patient months found that PD catheters embedded under the skin are most likely to work if used from 48-133 days after placement—and least likely to have peritonitis if used even later: after 134 days. Using PD catheters before 47 days was linked to higher failures and more peritonitis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  3. How to start late-referred ESRD patients on PD urgently

    When as many as half of Americans with ESRD have less than 3 months notice before needing dialysis, it's great to know that PD can safely be done as a first treatment. This avoids HD catheters, keeps working folks employed, and buys time for a fistula or transplant. This article describes patients who did very well.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. Need a PD catheter? Laparoscopic placement is better

    Some surgeons place PD catheters "blind" (without imaging), while others use a laparoscope to let them see inside of the peritoneum before they insert the catheter. A new study finds—not surprisingly—that it's best to see what you're doing. Laparoscopic placement had a almost an 18% better success rate and fewer revisions or replacments.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  5. Lipid-lowering drugs save lives on PD

    A new look at data from 1,053 people on PD from the USRDS has found that statins and other drugs that lower blood lipid (fat) levels seem to have a big impact on survival. Death rates from all causes or heart disease dropped by 26% and 33%, respectively.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  6. Larger patients can safely do PD

    A brand new Canadian study of 4,054 people on PD from 1994 to 2003 has found that a high body mass index (BMI > 30) was not linked with worse survival in people on PD—though a BMI of less than 18.5 was. The researchers concluded that "High BMI patients should not be discouraged from PD just because of their size."

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  7. PD fluid with amino acids may help prevent malnutrition—and improve heart health

    Basing PD fluid on amino acids (AA') instead of glucose may improve nutrition on PD in the future. A new study switched 13 non-diabetic PD patients from glucose to AA-based fluid. Uptake of amino acids by the skeletal muscles was significantly better with the AA fluid (read more here). Another study of AA-based PD fluid found it less likely than glucose-based fluid to cause release of hormones (leptin and adipnectin) linked with heart problems.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  8. November 2006 Kidney International supplement focuses on PD

    Is survival better on PD or HD? What factors predict PD success? What are best practices in PD catheter placement? Does use of biocompatible PD solution reduce peritonitis? Learn the answers to these and many other key PD questions in the November 2006 supplement of KI. (For kidney professionals who don't subscribe to Kidney International, we've compiled the links to all of the abstracts from the special supplement on PD (November 2006). You can find them below.

    Note to dialyzors: Kidney International is a medical journal for professionals. Feel free to read the abstracts—and please write and let us know if there is information you think we should focus on for a future "Life@Home" article. We'd love to hear from you!

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  9. Protect the peritoneal membrane to do PD longer

    A new review article suggests replacing some glucose-based dialysate exchanges with icodextrin, resting the peritoneum, using bicarbonate or pyruvate as a buffer, and treating infections immediately as ways to help protect the peritoneal membrane.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  10. C-reactive protein may help identify those at greater risk of post-peritonitis problems

    People with higher CRP levels during and after peritonitis were at higher risk for relapse, a switch to HD, or death than those with lower levels, found a study in the Feb. 14 issue of Kidney International. CRP levels may be a useful screening tool.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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