Journal Watch

  1. PKD is not a barrier to successful PD

    In a study that compared 56 people with polycystic kidney disease on PD to 56 non-diabetic people with small kidneys on PD, there were no differences between the two groups after 37 months.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  2. Nocturnal HD protects blood vessels

    Damage to smooth muscle cells may be one reason why people on standard in-center HD tend to have more clogged and calcified arteries. In 15 patients studied before and after switching from standard HD to nocturnal HD, there was better smooth muscle growth and less cell death on nocturnal. (Blood pressure, PTH levels, and phosphorus levels improved, too.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  3. Longer survival on PD with ACE-inhibitors or ARBs

    Even if blood pressure is normal, taking blood pressure pills in the ACE-inhibitor or ARB class was linked with much better survival in a new study. Researchers studied 306 new PD users from 2001 to 2005. Even adjusting for age, blood pressure, and other illnesses, those who took the BP pills had a 62% lower risk of death.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  4. Matching home dialysis to lifestyle

    A "continuum home program concept" described in a new article would help people with kidney failure continue their lifestyles with dialysis—rather than disrupt them with treatment. The aim is for a continuous flow of services from education to treatment choice, dialysis access, and option changes when needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  5. PD: Less cancer risk than standard HD

    DNA damage that can lead to cancer can occur in kidney failure, as the buildup of toxins stresses the body. A new study looked at genetic damage in 20 people on standard in-center HD, 20 on PD matched for gender and age, and 40 controls. Cheek swabs were used to look for DNA damage. Creatinine levels, smoking, alcohol use, age, income, and length of time on dialysis were also examined. The only factor that mattered was length of time on standard HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  6. Does icodextrin (extraneal) cause more peritonitis?

    Doesn't look like it. A study observed icodextrin and regular, sugar-based PD fluid use in 722 people. No differences were found in the rate of peritonitis infection or so-called "sterile periotnitis" where no bacteria are found.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  7. MYTHBUSTERS: microwaving PD fluid does NOT create glucose degradation products (GDPs)

    While the belief persists that microwaving PD bags creates harmful GDPs when sugars are caramelized, the literature does not bear this out:

    GDPs are a concern with PD fluid, but these are created when the fluid is manufactured, not when it is heated by the user. Of course, "hot spots" are still a concern. Anyone using a microwave to heat PD fluid should flip the bag from side to side to mix the contents well and use a thermometer strip to reduce the risk of burns.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  8. Biocompatible PD fluid helps adequacy

    "Glucose degradation products" (GDPs) occur when sugars are caramelized as PD fluid is made. GDPs can reduce PD adequacy, and in time, harm the peritoneum. A new study of 104 PD patients who randomly received standard fluid or a pH neutral fluid with fewer GDPs found that the new fluid led to better adequacy.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  9. Once-a-month IV Aranesp keeps up Hgb levels on PD

    It would sure be convenient to only need anemia drugs once a month—and a new study suggests that this can work for people using PD. In a study of 72 folks on PD, hemoglobins were kept in the target range with once-monthly dosing.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags:

  10. Predicting blood vessel calcification in PD

    In a study of 231 PD patients, those whose C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 levels were higher had a higher risk of blood vessel calcification and heart problems than those with lower levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: