Journal Watch

  1. Inflammation helps explain EPO resistance on PD

    Sometimes high doses of EPO are needed to reach a target hemoglobin. Why? A new study found that on PD, inflammation (measured by c-reactive protein), too-low levels of serum albumin, and abnormal levels of PTH were some of the factors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  2. On PD and need a colonoscopy? Ask for antibiotics first

    A new study of 77 people on PD who had 97 colonoscopies found that peritonitis is much less likely when antibiotics are taken before it was done. Even in those who did get peritonitis, antibiotic treatment worked.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  3. Pipeline PD technology: Vincenza wearable artificial kidney minicycler

    What if instead of exchanging bags of fluid for CAPD, you put in one fresh bag each morning, then wore a small pump to filter and regenerate it over and over? You'd save time—and use a lot less fluid. This system, invented by Dr. Claudio Ronco and associates in Italy, is being tested right now.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. Access-challenged people on HD have a new HeRO

    Running out of vascular access sites is no laughing matter. A new fully-implantable dialysis catheter helps solve the infection risk that occurs when a catheter goes through the skin and into a central vein. In a new study of 36 people, the Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) had infection rates similar to grafts.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  5. Tidal PD preserves residual kidney function longer

    In tidal PD, instead of draining ALL of the fluid out after an exchange, some fluid is always left in the peritoneum. A new, small study suggests that this technique may allow longer use of PD by helping to preserve residual kidney function. After 3 years, 10 dialyzors using tidal PD had significantly higher renal creatinine clearance and urine output than 19 automated PD users.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  6. Straight talk: Improve CKD outcomes by prescribing better dialysis

    Longer or more-frequent treatments, better access choices, ultrapure water, and better removal of fluid and toxic middle molecules could improve survival on dialysis, say researchers.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. Better CKD care saves lives

    People who met targets for access, hemoglobin, and blood protein levels before starting dialysis were far more likely to survive the first year, finds a new study of 192,307 patients. But just 2% met all three goals—even when they'd been seeing a nephrologist for a year.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  8. Give me a D!

    No, it's not your grade in math. A new study has found that deficiency of vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin) is present in 79% of people on dialysis—especially if they start treatment in the winter. Too-low levels have been linked to bone and heart disease. Ask your doctor if your levels are where they should be.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  9. People want treatments that offer FREEDOM

    A new study interviewed 52 people who were on one of 4 types of dialysis or had a transplant—and learned that "freedom, convenience, self-care, effectiveness, and simplicity" were important. (We could have told you that.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. Need high doses of EPO? Might want to check for CMV

    A new study from the Netherlands has found that people who have ESRD and have been exposed to the cytomegalovirus (CMV) have immune changes. With fewer working T-cells, they can't respond as well to anemia drugs.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease