Journal Watch

  1. Using PET Results to Screen for Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis (EPS)

    Identifying EPS early is vital to effectively treat this rare but devastating problem. Researchers studied whether the amount of sodium removed from the dialysate (sodium sieving) could predict EPS, in a 20-year study of 161 people. Age at PD start, duration of PD, and sodium sieving were all important predictors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/09/2017)

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  2. PD Patient Education in Australia

    Clinical PD outcomes in Australia were as much as 10-fold different from one site to another. An effort to standardize PD teaching has begun to improve PD outcomes. Of the 54 PD clinics, 70% completed an online survey about their PD teaching practices—which varied widely in the number of hours and presence of competency assessments.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/09/2017)

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  3. Gender, PD Dose, and Anemia

    Do gender and PD adequacy matter in anemia treatment, wondered researchers? Yes, as it turned out. A two-part study first included 2,180 prevalent PD patients, then followed 88 new PD patients for 3 years, recording data once a year. Regardless of adequacy, women had lower hemoglobin levels than men at every point—even with higher ESA doses.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/09/2017)

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  4. NxStage Outcomes in France and Belgium

    Among 62 patients from 31 centers in France and Belgium, albumin and bicarbonate levels improved significantly, and technique survival was 75% at one year (most who stopped received transplants). Despite the low volume of dialysate, the rsearchers concluded that dialysis adequacy was acceptable.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/09/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. PD vs. In-center HD for Time to Transplant (in Italy)

    In the US, research has found that people who use PD receive transplants about 50% faster than those on standard in-center HD, despite comparable listing numbers. The same seems to be true in Italy. In the Province of Trento, which has increased PD use from 7 to 47%, an analysis of 279 HD and 132 PD patients found that time to transplant was about 330 days for HD and 224 for PD—a significant difference.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/09/2016)

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  6. PD Catheter Fixation Works

    Can we keep PD catheters in place? This study compared 152 people who were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 had their PD catheters placed with traditional open surgery. Group 2 had a modified open surgery placement. Group 3 had open surgery with the PD catheter fixated to the lower abdominal wall, and a vertical tunnel. After 6 months, all of the PD catheters worked in the fixated group—a much higher rate than for Group 1. There were no significant differences in infection, bleeding, leakage, pain, hernia, or wound healing.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/09/2016)

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  7. Urgent Start PD vs. HD

    Which option is better if someone “crashes” into dialysis? A retrospective study was done of 178 people who started dialysis urgently between January, 2013 and December, 2014. Those who started PD had far fewer complications in the first 30 days. HD patients had more bloodstream infections. Survival was about the same for both groups.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/09/2016)

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  8. Systematic Review of Pregnancy on HD

    A new review summarizes 101 full papers and 25 abstracts and addresses the promise of successful pregnancy if enough HD is given.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/10/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  9. The HEMO Study Returns with a New Message

    “An index only on the basis of urea does not provide a sufficient measure of dialysis adequacy,” finds yet another reanalysis of the by-now-ancient HEMO study data. Looking only at small uremic solutes—even non-urea wastes—did not predict all-cause mortality. Doing HD just three times a week made it impossible to remove enough solutes to matter.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/10/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. Time Matters: HD Kt Dose , Hospitalization, and Death

    Does adding more HD benefit patients? Yes, finds a Fresenius study of 6,129 patients in Spain. There as a progressive increase in the risk of death for patients who were below the target Kt, and as Kt rose to reach and exceed the target, the risk declined, as did the risk of hospitalization. “Thus, prescribing an additional 3 L or more above the minimum Kt dose could potentially reduce mortality risk, and 9 L or more reduce hospitalization risk,” noted the authors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/10/2016)

    Tags: Hemodialysis