Journal Watch

  1. One way to reduce oxidative stress in PD patients

    Oxygen is a great thing—in the right amounts. But, too much can wreak cellular havoc and even damage the heart. In people on PD, oxidative stress can hurt the peritoneum, too. Antioxidants to the rescue! A Greek study looked at the impact of vitamins C and E (alone and combined) in 20 people on PD vs. 10 healthy controls. Both of the vitamins reduced oxidative stress markers. (Talk to your doctor before taking any medication, vitamin, or supplement).

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/02/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. Why nocturnal HD reduces sudden cardiac death

    Prolonged QTc intervals between heartbeats increases the rate of sudden cardiac death in people whose kidneys work. In an ECG study, patients who did nocturnal HD had shorter QTc intervals—even if those intervals were long before dialysis and even before changes to the left ventricle.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  3. Mineral balance in long HD

    A metaanalysis from Canada of 21 studies concluded that keeping dialysate calcium ≥1.5 mmol/L for most patients on long/long-frequent HD prevents an increase in PTH levels and a decline in bone mineral density—without raising the risk of calcification. Adding phosphate to the dialysate for those with a low predialysis level or very low level makes sense.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  4. New Vwing device helps start Buttonholes

    A new, surgically implanted device used for 387 cannulations over 6 months in 9 patients was successful 94% of the time. But, standard cannulation for the other needle only worked 77% of the time. This device may help with difficult to cannulate fistulas.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. Wearable and implantable artificial kidneys

    Thrice weekly in-center HD for 4 hours or less is a paradigm that must change to improve patient outcomes. But longer and/or more frequent treatments are not practically available to the total dialysis population. Thus, radical new approaches are needed—like wearable devices or implantable ones.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis

  6. Predialysis patient education boosts use of PD

    In a 4-year period, 227 patients attended a CKD education program. Compared to a control group who did not attend, the educated patients were almost twice as likely to choose PD (54.3% vs. 28%).

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. Informed decision-making about dialysis options

    Among 99 dialysis patients from 15 clinics in North Carolina, 67% said they felt like they had no choice about their modality, and about a third felt that the choice had already been made by their doctor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  8. Overweight people (90 Kg) do well on PD

    Forty-three patients who weighed more than 90 Kg had significantly fewer hernias and leaks than matched controls who weighed less than 90 Kg. They also had the same number of hospital days and stays and lived just as long.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/22/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. Itching? It May Be Due To High Calcium—Not Phosphorus

    A study of 120 HD patients found high levels of serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in those with and without dialysis itching (pruritus). But, the itchiest patients had significantly higher serum calcium levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/17/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. PD Dialysate With Hydrogen May Protect Peritoneal Membranes

    Over time, the peritoneum can be harmed by glucose degradation products in PD dialysate. In 6 patients, PD fluid with dissolved hydrogen significantly reduced oxidative stress vs. standard PD fluid.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/17/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis