Journal Watch

  1. Metanalysis of low-glucose PD fluid and residual kidney function

    An analysis of six randomized controlled trials of neutral pH, low-glucose PD fluids has found that patients who used these fluids had a much slower rate of residual kidney function loss and much higher weekly Kt/Vs than those using standard PD fluids. There were no significant differences between groups in ultrafiltration, blood pressure, or all-cause mortality.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. Biocompatible PD fluids are cost-effective (in capitated systems…)

    In Australia, where the cost of hospitalization is of concern to the National Healthcare System, one group of PD patients was given biocompatible PD fluid, while a control group received standard PD fluid. After 2 years, the more costly biocompatible fluid created significant cost savings due to reduced peritonitis and hospital stays.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  3. Icodextrin reduces PD failure and boosts survival

    In a prospective trial of 306 incident PD patients between 2007 and 2011, those who used icodextrin were significantly more likely to continue with PD and more likely to live longer than those who used standard PD fluid.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. To stop PD catheter migration: location, location, location

    The “real estate” used for PD catheter placement matters in preventing catheter tip migration, a study finds. Compared to 98 people who received conventional left quadrant PD catheter placement, 139 whose catheters were placed in the right lower quadrant had significantly less catheter tip migration (19.3% vs. 3.6%; P<0.01) with similar inflow and outflow time, ultrafiltration volume, infection, hemorrhage, and obstruction rates.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  5. On PD, less inflammation linked with longer survival

    Among 87 people on PD, ages 30-85, who were followed for 30 months, the inflammation marker serum amyloid-A (SAA) was a significant independent predictor of mortality. When four markers of inflammation were analyzed together, SAA, age, and the presence of cerebrovascular insults were the strongest predictors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  6. More reasons to use PD fluid with less sugar

    Using a novel index created by dividing the glucose content of PD solution by body weight, this study looked at the impact of PD fluid sugar on hemoglobin A1c, fluid overload, and inflammation (measured by interleukin (IL) 6) in 43 people on PD. Higher sugar levels were linked with worse diabetes control, more fluid overload, and higher IL-6 levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  7. Nocturnal home HD catheter sepsis rates similar to in-center

    When 63 nocturnal home HD patients with catheters were matched 1:20 with standard in-center HD patients, both groups had similar rates of sepsis. The catheters lasted about the same length of time.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Home Dialysis

  8. How patients and care partners feel about home HD

    A review of 24 qualitative studies of home HD patients and care partners found five themes: feeling vulnerable, fear of being alone, concerns about family burden, opportunity to thrive, and appreciating medical responsiveness. Starting home HD seemed to be an especially anxious time. Acknowledging these themes and offering reassurance may help more people succeed on home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Home Dialysis

  9. Bioartificial kidney challenges

    When Shuvo Roy is an author on a bioartificial kidney review paper, you know it is worth reading. Cell-based therapies are an approach to duplicate all of the functions of a healthy kidney, including hormone production. But, where the cells come from, organ scaffolding, and immune response remain challenges even in animals—let alone humans.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  10. FHN finding: Frequent and/or Nocturnal HD lowers blood pressure

    In the Frequent Hemodialysis Network trials, those randomized to short daily HD had systolic BP an average of 7.7 points lower than those in the standard HD group. Diastolic BP came down an average of 3.9 points. Fewer BP meds were needed. Those who did nocturnal HD had systolic BP an average of 7.3 points lower, and diastolic an average of 4.2 points lower.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Nocturnal Hemodialysis