Journal Watch

  1. Arterial stiffness is equally high in PD and standard in-center HD

    Arteries are supposed to be flexible. In a study of 35 people on PD and 26 doing standard HD, both groups had equally stiff arteries that were more rigid than those of the general public.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/26/2012)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. Antibiotic ointment reduces PD exit site infections, but not peritonitis

    Researchers studied 1,270 people who used mupirocin ointment on their PD catheters, 502 used gentamycin, and 1,203 did not use an antibiotic ointment. While the ointments helped prevent exit site infections, they did not reduce the rate of peritonitis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/26/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  3. Coiled vs. straight PD catheters—is one better than the other?

    Researchers in China randomly assigned 80 people doing PD to a straight or a coiled catheter and looked at results from an 493 more people on PD. No differences were found in migration of the catheter tips, catheter failure, infection, stopping PD, or death between the two types of catheters. In the larger analysis, coiled catheters had far more problems than straight ones.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/26/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. International practice patterns for "non-conventional" HD

    311 nephrologists from around the world took part in an online survey about use of HD options other than standard in-center. Among the respondents, 62.4% used "non-conventional" options: 26.7% used nocturnal HD, 34.4% used short daily HD, and 26% used long standard treatments.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. Pregnancy and more dialysis

    In general, pregnancy is uncommon in women with ESRD. But more dialysis seems to improve pregnancy outcomes. This review article addresses fertility issues, pregnancy, and suggestions for how to manage dialysis in pregnant women.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. Normalizing "unphysiology" with longer and/or more frequent HD

    Studies of intensified HD regimens have found superior results to standard in-center HD, including better cardiac outcomes. This review article surveys the evidence that supports the hypothesis that more physiologic dialysis leads to better outcomes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  7. Home HD costs in Canada

    Learn the costs of standard in-center HD vs. short daily and nocturnal in this new review article. (Home costs less!)

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  8. Alternate night nocturnal HD in Australia

    Every other night nocturnal HD is a popular option in Australia. Patients who use this option have lower phosphorus levels and better volume control and well-being—at about the same cost as standard in-center HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  9. More home HD in Australia and New Zealand—because doctors believe in it

    In contrast to the rest of the world, Australia and New Zealand have an average of 12.9% of patients using home HD. Why? Because nephrologists, nurses, and funding agencies hold strong beliefs in the clinical and economic benefits of this option.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. Green dialysis – reducing energy use and landfill space

    Worldwide, dialysis uses an estimated 156 billion liters of water per year, 1.62 billion kilowatt hours of power, and generates 625,000 tons of plastic waste. Our own Dr. John Agar suggests ways to reduce the carbon footprint of dialysis through water conservation, solar power, and other ideas.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/22/2011)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis