Journal Watch

  1. If at first you don't succeed with PD...it still costs less than in-center HD

    A 4-year Canadian study has found that over a 3-year period, the cost of starting on PD and then switching to HD ($114,503) is still much less than doing standard in-center HD ($175,996). But starting and continuing PD is the lowest cost dialysis option ($58,724).

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. What does glucose in PD fluid have to do with artery calcification?

    Quite a bit, it appears. Among 50 people doing PD who did not have diabetes, about half had coronary artery calcification. Those who used more higher glucose PD fluids were more likely to have the problem, as were men with a history of heart disease, and those who did not get enough PD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  3. Community house home hemodialysis in Australia and New Zealand

    Not everyone who wants to dialyze at home is able to. In Australia and New Zealand unstaffed, non-medical community homes fill a gap to make "home" treatments possible. This observational study compared mortality among 113 community home dialyzers to 5,591 people on PD, 1,532 on home HD, and 5,647 on in-center HD. Community house HD was safe and effective.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Phosphate is a blood vessel toxin

    High levels of phosphorus in the blood is linked with blood vessel calcification, thickened blood vessel walls, arterial stiffness, and heart damage—and may even cause premature aging.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  5. Modality choice is a factor in AV fistula creation

    Canadian researchers compared the predialysis modality preferences of 508 people to their actual modality, and looked at their vascular accesses. The chance of having a fistula was much less in those who chose PD but started HD (39%), or who made no choice (50%), than in those who preferred HD and started on HD (79%).

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  6. Improve PD uptake by addressing misconceptions

    In Singapore, interviews with predialysis patients and their families, people on dialysis, and health care professionals were done to explore how a treatment option choice is made. Fear of PD, daily commitment to PD, and misperceptions of PD were barriers that kept people from choosing the option. Patients were strongly influenced by other patients and wanted to hear what day-to-day life would be like before making a choice.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  7. Neutral pH PD fluid protects peritoneal membranes

    Standard PD fluid may have an acidic pH and contain high levels of glucose degradation products (GDPs). Japanese researchers followed 12 patients using standard fluid and 12 using a neutral pH fluid with low GDPs. The low GDP group had less membrane fibrosis, blood vessel sclerosis, and build up of AGEs, and had higher ultrafiltration volume than the high GDP group.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  8. HbA1c levels do not predict survival in PD patients with diabetes

    Researchers seeking a hemoglobin A1c target for PD patients with diabetes were not able to find any change in survival among 91 patients whose A1c levels were <6.5%, 6.5–8%, or >8%.

    Read the abstract » | (added 12/19/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. Home HD for obese patients

    In Australia, a 215 Kg man has successfully dialyzed at home for 8 years, after training by a program that has trained 23 obese (BMI >30) people to date. Home HD is a cost effective option with good outcomes in this group.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/27/2012)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. CAPD improved outcomes in hard to treat CHF

    In a study in Spain, 28 people with advanced congestive heart failure were treated with PD, while 34 controls were not. Sixteen months later, those who did PD were 40% more likely to survive.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/27/2012)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis