Journal Watch

  1. PD corrects metabolic acidosis better than standard in-center HD

    Too-low bicarbonate levels are a risk factor for death. Among 110,951 standard in-center HD patients and 10,400 PD patients, bicarb levels were much lower in those on PD. Survival data suggest that it is safest to keep bicarb levels higher than 22mEq/L for all ESRD patients—on any modality.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. Multidisciplinary training to reduce peritonitis in PD

    Researchers in Uruguay developed a tool to assess practical PD skills. They found that one on one lessons, retraining, and group meetings for PD patients cut the peritonitis rate nearly in half.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  3. Alert: Icodextrin PD fluid can mask hypoglycemia

    A case report of an 80 year old man in the emergency room highlights the need for healthcare providers to be aware of the impact of icodextrin PD fluid on blood sugar. Handheld glucose meters can overestimate blood sugar. A lab test can verify blood sugar if symptoms of hypoglycema are present and the glucometer reading is normal.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Review: survival on intensive HD vs. transplant

    Canadian researcher Robert Pauly reviews the literature on survival with short daily and nocturnal HD, and compares it to kidney transplant survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  5. Can more fluid removal mean needing less toxin removal?

    Makers of a wearable ultrafiltration (UF; water removal) device wanted to know if daily UF could be a way to cut back on the need for dialysis toxin removal. For 4 weeks, 13 in-center patients had 4 days a week of UF plus 2 days a week of HD. Then they did 4 weeks of standard, 3x week HD. Daily UF lowered blood pressure and weight gain between treatments significantly—while Kt/V rose.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Chronic Kidney Disease

  6. When choosing a treatment option, lifestyle is what matters to patients

    A metaanalysis found 16 studies of how people with late-stage CKD choose what type of dialysis to do. Common elements included the life-or-death nature of ESRD; minimal intrusion of treatment into quality of life, autonomy, values, and sense of self; and making informed choices.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. Surgery to fix PD catheters in place is safe, effective

    PD catheters that move around in the belly can be painful and may stop working. Korean doctors compared 22 PD catheters placed by a laparoscopic technique that fixed them in place to 32 placed by open surgery. The age and sex of both groups was the same, and the fixing technique took longer to do. But, 29 months later, the fixed catheters were much less likely to move (13.6% vs. 65.6%). Both techniques had the same catheter and patient survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  8. PD: Better survival than standard in-center HD

    DaVita followed 23,718 patients new to dialysis for 2 years. Those who chose PD (1,358) were nine times more likely to switch treatment options and three times more likely to get a transplant than those who chose standard in-center HD. The PD patients also had 48% better survival than those who did standard in-center HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. PD + C + E = reduced oxidative stress

    We need oxygen to live. But, too much of a good thing can cause heart and blood vessel damage, and, if you do PD, damage your peritoneum. What can help? Among 20 people doing PD, supplements of the antioxidants vitamins C and E improved measures of oxidative stress, compared to 10 healthy volunteers who did not take the vitamins. (Ask your nephrologist if this is wise for you.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  10. If at first you don't succeed with PD...it still costs less than in-center HD

    A 4-year Canadian study has found that over a 3-year period, the cost of starting on PD and then switching to HD ($114,503) is still much less than doing standard in-center HD ($175,996). But starting and continuing PD is the lowest cost dialysis option ($58,724).

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/25/2013)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis