Journal Watch - Australia

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  1. CKD education rates in Australia (they're FAR better than in the US!)

    It's hard to choose a treatment option for kidney failure that fits your life when you don't know what the options are, or how they might affect you. A study of 721 people new to dialysis in Australia found that 603 (84%) had options education before they started treatment.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/23/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  2. Australian nephrologists say PD first, then nocturnal HD

    A lengthy survey of Australian nephrologists found strong agreement that long HD is a good option—most easily done at home, and that PD is a great first choice for dialysis. In fact, 34% of respondents said their clinic had a "PD First" policy.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/23/2011)

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  3. Watch your water soluble vitamins on nocturnal HD

    More dialysis washes more vitamins out of the blood, finds a new study from Australia. Among people who were doing nocturnal HD, levels of vitamin C and thiamine were low. Supplements may be wise—ask your doctor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. Somebody does it better

    Like the U.S., Australia now requires folks with CKD to be educated about all treatment options. Unlike the U.S., they are following up to see if this is happening. A new study of 721 people with CKD found that 84% had options education before starting treatment. (We'd bet that the rates here are still far, far lower!)

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  5. Green dialysis: Saving the planet

    Dialysis uses a lot of power and a lot of water. Reusing those resources saves water, energy, and money. Our own Dr. John Agar has a new paper out about his solar dialysis and water reuse practices in Australia.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  6. Nocturnal HD helps bone mineral status

    Doing nocturnal home HD every other night helps bone minerals stay at more normal levels than standard treatments, say researchers from Australia in a new study. After 26 patients switched from standard (home) to nocturnal HD, their serum phosphorus and calcium-phosphorus products fell, most needed no binders, and bone mineral density was stable. Plus, blood vessel calcification improved or at least was stable in 87.5%.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  7. A honey of an idea

    Some clinics help prevent peritonitis in people with PD by using an antibiotic ointment. But bacteria may become resistant. In Australia, a new randomized study of Medihoney, a honey-based wound dressing (which is FDA-approved in the US) will see whether exit site or tunnel infections or peritonitis can be reduced.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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