Journal Watch - Icodextrin

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  1. Icodextrin metaanalysis – no impact on patient survival

    Australian researchers analyzed 11 studies of icodextrin vs. glucose PD fluid (1222 patients). Icodextrin did help reduce fluid overload without harming residual kidney function. But, it did not help reduce peritonitis, technique failure, or other adverse events. And, patients who used icodextrin did not live any longer.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/29/2013)

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  2. Alert: Icodextrin PD fluid can mask hypoglycemia

    A case report of an 80 year old man in the emergency room highlights the need for healthcare providers to be aware of the impact of icodextrin PD fluid on blood sugar. Handheld glucose meters can overestimate blood sugar. A lab test can verify blood sugar if symptoms of hypoglycema are present and the glucometer reading is normal.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/27/2013)

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  3. Yes, PD can be done with diabetes

    PD is gentle on the blood vessels. With use of icodextrin and other steps to optimize glucose and volume control, it can be a good option for those with diabetes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/28/2011)

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  4. Blood glucose meters may overestimate blood sugar levels when Icodextrin PD fluid is used

    If you use a blood sugar monitor, you need to be able to trust the results. But, they may not be accurate if you use Icodextrin PD fluid. A case report of four people with insulin-dependent diabetes found that their blood sugar monitor readings were normal—at the same time that their hospital drawn blood sugars were dangerously low.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/26/2011)

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  5. Better PD technique survival in people with diabetes who use icodextrin

    In the first randomized control trial using icodextrin in lieu of glucose for PD solution, 41 people with diabetic nephropathy were assigned one or the other. After 2 years, 71.4% of the icodextrin group was still doing PD, while only 45% who used glucose-based solution still did PD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/25/2011)

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  6. Better fluid removal with icodextrin PD fluid - Meta-analysis

    A new study of 9 randomized controlled trials has found that people using icodextrin removed much more water than those using glucose based fluid—with no change in residual kidney function or increase in peritonitis or death. Rash was more common in those using icodextrin.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/30/2011)

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  7. Meta-analysis: Icodextrin PD fluid really does have advantages

    In a study of 9 randomized controlled trials, icodextrin removed much more water from the blood of people who did PD than standard glucose-based PD fluid without causing any more health problems for them.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  8. Icodextrin PD fluid causes less weight gain

    We're not surprised to learn that PD fluid that doesn't contain dextrose (sugar) is less likely to cause weight gain! A study of 183 PD patients found weight gains after 3 years (88% of it fat) among those using standard fluid, and significantly less weight gain in an icodextrin group.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  9. Diabetes + PD? Icodextrin-aided fluid removal and metabolic control

    A randomized controlled trial of glucose PD fluid vs. icodextrin (ICO) found significant benefits. Among 59 people with diabetes on CAPD, those in the group using ICO for the long exchange were far less likely to need higher concentration fluid (9% vs. 66%). And, the ICO group needed less insulin, had lower triglycerides, and had lower A1cs.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  10. Icodextrin improved nutrition and inflammation in PD

    Replacing glucose-based PD fluid with icodextrin led to 66% better fluid removal, significantly higher protein levels, and significantly lower levels of the inflammation marker CRP.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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