Journal Watch - Pd Catheter

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  1. A Novel Surgical Technique for Urgent Start PD

    Placing a PD catheter with a double purse-string around the inner cuff was safe and feasible for urgent start PD, finds a study of 135 catheter insertions between 2011 and 2018. Double-cuffed straight Tenckhoff catheters were implanted surgically or semi-surgically using the double purse-string technique, and the incidence of leakages, dislocations, peritonitis, and exit-site infection were low. There were no bleeding events, bowel perforations, or hernia formations.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/09/2020)

    Tags: Pd Catheter, Double Purse String, Urgent Start Pd

  2. A Post-op Surgical Girdle for Pain and Catheter Tunnel Infections in Urgent Start PD

    Urgent start PD can be associated with pain and tunnel infections. In a study of 85 consecutive PD catheter placements, a surgical girdle was used from days 1-3 while patients were supine. Among the 23 patients who completed pain surveys, the girdle helped significantly. Tunnel infections were reduced as well.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/16/2019)

    Tags: Urgent Start Pd, Pain, Tunnel Infection, Pd Catheter, Surgical Girdle

  3. Low vs. Very Low Site PD Catheter Placement to Prevent Migration

    A retrospective 5-year series of 76 patients whose PD catheter tips migrated had received either a traditional low-site insertion (N=39) or a very-low-site insertion (N=37). After 2 years of follow up, the very-low-site group had significantly better catheter and patient survival, with fewer catheter complications—and no tip migration.

    Read the abstract » | (added 06/13/2019)

    Tags: Catheter Dysfunction, Catheter Migration, Pd Catheter, Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter, Patient Survival

  4. Moving the PD Exit Site to Combat Infection

    A 5-year retrospective cohort analysis looked at the impact of treating PD exit site and tunnel infections in 27 patients by removing the cuff and relocating the catheter under local anesthetic. After follow up ranging from 10.8 to 79.4 months, no leaks occurred, and the infections resolved in 74% of the patients. The rest had to have their catheters removed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 06/13/2019)

    Tags: Exit Site Relocation, Exit Site Infection, Tunnel Infection, Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter, Pd Catheter

  5. To Reinsert a PD Catheter or Not to Reinsert: That is the Question

    Among 470 PD patients in Singapore, 92 required PD catheter removal. Of these, 39% had a second PD catheter placed, while the rest switched to HD. Patients who could not continue PD were excluded from the analysis. Survival was about the same in both groups. Surprisingly, those who required catheter removal due to infection were more likely to be able to continue PD than those who required it due to catheter malfunction.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/15/2019)

    Tags: Pd Catheter, Hd, Catheter Remova

  6. PD and Inflammation

    The moment a PD catheter is inserted or fluid is instilled in the peritoneum, a cascade of cytokines occurs. This reaction is reduced somewhat when a neutral-pH, low-GDP fluid is used, vs. a conventional one, finds a new observational study.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/15/2018)

    Tags: Pd Catheter, Cytokines, Low Gdp Fluid