Journal Watch - Patient Survival

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  1. Is PD Unwise for Patients with Lupus Nephritis?

    A small study found 92.4% (1 year), 84.7% (3 year) and 67.6% (5 year) patient survival among 28 non-diabetic lupus patients doing PD—compared to 100% (1 year), 93.5% (3 year), and 82.9% (5 year) among 56 controls. While the lupus was not directly associated with mortality, it was a risk factor for PD technique failure, infection, and hospitalizations.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/16/2019)

    Tags: Patient Survival, Lupus, Pd, Mortality, Technique Failure, Infection, Hospitalization

  2. Low vs. Very Low Site PD Catheter Placement to Prevent Migration

    A retrospective 5-year series of 76 patients whose PD catheter tips migrated had received either a traditional low-site insertion (N=39) or a very-low-site insertion (N=37). After 2 years of follow up, the very-low-site group had significantly better catheter and patient survival, with fewer catheter complications—and no tip migration.

    Read the abstract » | (added 06/13/2019)

    Tags: Catheter Dysfunction, Catheter Migration, Pd Catheter, Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter, Patient Survival

  3. PD Technique Survival by Equipment Manufacturer

    An Australia/New Zealand study of all 16,575 new PD patients between 1995 and 2014 compared PD cyclers made by Baxter, Fresenius, or Gambro. Gambro users had the fewest days to technique failure among the 72% who had it, followed by Fresenius, and then Baxter.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/11/2019)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis Systems, Comparison, Technique Failure, Patient Survival

  4. 35-year Patient Survival on Home HD

    A case study reports on the 35-year survival of a man with Alport’s syndrome who uses thrice-weekly conventional home HD—and still works 6-8 hours per day at age 65—despite no residual kidney function.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/11/2018)

    Tags: Maintenance Dialysis, Patient Survival

  5. High Peritoneal Transport and Long-term PD Outcomes

    Among 470 patients who did PD for up to 10 years in Hong Kong, the peritoneal transport rate was able to differentiate survivors. After the first few years of PD, having high peritoneal transport became a significant risk factor for mortality.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/11/2018)

    Tags: Trend Of Peritoneal Transport, Patient Survival

  6. Peritoneal Membrane Transport and Survival on PD

    Among 470 PD patients followed for up to 10 years, high transporters were stable for the first few years, and after 5 years or so, PD adequacy began to slowly fall. The rate of PD transport did not affect patient survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 01/11/2018)

    Tags: High Transporters, Pd Adequacy, Pd Transport, Patient Survival