Journal Watch

  • CKD patients report lack of kidney knowledge

    Folks can't choose a home therapy if they don't know it exists. In a new study of 676 people with stage 3–5 chronic kidney disease, most reported having limited or no understanding of their options. The new Conditions for Coverage should help.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • Phosphorus in colas linked to CKD progression

    Soda is already worthless nutritionally—and some types can also raise the risk of chronic kidney disease. A recent study found almost 2 1/2 times the risk of CKD in those who drank 2 or more cola's a day (regular or diet). If you must drink the stuff, looks like it's safest to switch to a non-cola flavor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • Prevent buttonhole infections with Mupirocin

    The Buttonhole technique for fistulas lessens needle pain, missed cannulations, and bumpy aneurysms. The only downside? A higher risk of staph infection. A new study finds that prescription mupirocin (Bactroban®) ointment, an antibiotic, reduced that risk by 35 times!

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Why Canadians choose self-care dialysis

    A new study randomized 70 new ESRD patients into standard options classes or to have the benefits of self-care taught with a booklet, video, and small group brainstorms. Compared to the group getting standard education, benefits group patients who valued lifestyle were 7 times more likely to choose self-care; those who valued freedom were 9.1 times more likely.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • Nocturnal HD protects blood vessels

    Damage to smooth muscle cells may be one reason why people on standard in-center HD tend to have more clogged and calcified arteries. In 15 patients studied before and after switching from standard HD to nocturnal HD, there was better smooth muscle growth and less cell death on nocturnal. (Blood pressure, PTH levels, and phosphorus levels improved, too.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • CAPD and CCPD come out even in meta-analysis

    A Cochrane database review looked at studies comparing CAPD and CCPD for peritonitis, hernias, switching to HD, fluid leaks, hospital stays, and death—and found no significant differences between them. CCPD may have some pluses in terms of schedule for younger, working patients.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • People want treatments that offer FREEDOM

    A new study interviewed 52 people who were on one of 4 types of dialysis or had a transplant—and learned that "freedom, convenience, self-care, effectiveness, and simplicity" were important. (We could have told you that.)

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • Give me a D!

    No, it's not your grade in math. A new study has found that deficiency of vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin) is present in 79% of people on dialysis—especially if they start treatment in the winter. Too-low levels have been linked to bone and heart disease. Ask your doctor if your levels are where they should be.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Tidal PD preserves residual kidney function longer

    In tidal PD, instead of draining ALL of the fluid out after an exchange, some fluid is always left in the peritoneum. A new, small study suggests that this technique may allow longer use of PD by helping to preserve residual kidney function. After 3 years, 10 dialyzors using tidal PD had significantly higher renal creatinine clearance and urine output than 19 automated PD users.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Surgical adhesions? PD may still be possible

    Conventional wisdom says that PD is not a good choice for people who've had complex abdominal surgery or have adhesions. But a study of two groups of people—with and one without adhesions—found no significant differences in catheter success, infections, or the need for more surgery.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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