Journal Watch

  • High ultrafiltration (UF) rates stress the heart

    Standard in-center HD requires high UF rates to remove fluid. A 5-year prospective study of 287 dialyzors from 2007 found this is a BAD idea. During the study, 149 patients died—69% due to heart problems. Survival was better with UF less than 12.37 ml/h/kg—which is much more doable at home.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

  • Fewer heart problems with nocturnal HD

    A new 2-year study from Canada looked at 42 folks on standard HD and 32 on nocturnal HD. Hospital stays for heart problems dropped in those using nocturnal, but stayed the same for the standard dialyzors. Lower phosphorus and better anemia control were also found in those using nocturnal.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

  • Stable hemoglobin levels predict survival in HD

    An analysis of 34,963 dialyzors found that variations in hemoglobin were harmful. In fact each 1 g/dL increase in hemoglobin variability raised the risk of death by 33%—even after adjusting for many other factors. Good anemia management can help you live longer.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

  • Human trial reports on wearable artificial kidney (WAK) in UK

    The competition for better home HD gets even hotter! The December 2007 edition of <i>Lancet</i> includes an article about use of the WAK in 5 men and 3 women, who tried the device for 4&ndash;8 hours. There were no adverse heart, electrolyte, or acid-base events&mdash;though some access problems did occur, and dialysis itself is not yet optimal. It's still cool, though.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)