Journal Watch

  • PKD is not a barrier to successful PD

    In a study that compared 56 people with polycystic kidney disease on PD to 56 non-diabetic people with small kidneys on PD, there were no differences between the two groups after 37 months.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • On PD, higher uric acid levels predict faster loss of kidney function

    Keeping as much of your kidney function as you can is a plus on PD or HD. A new study from Korea has found that people on PD whose levels of uric acid were higher had a faster decline in their kidney function. Those with higher blood pressure tended to have higher uric acid levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Need high doses of EPO? Might want to check for CMV

    A new study from the Netherlands has found that people who have ESRD and have been exposed to the cytomegalovirus (CMV) have immune changes. With fewer working T-cells, they can't respond as well to anemia drugs.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • Take your vitamins

    A new study finds that HD—with regular or high flux membranes—removes large amounts of water soluble vitamins.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Need a bone density test on PD? Be sure you're empty

    A new study has found that having fluid in your belly when you have a bone density test (called DXA) can change the results.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • November 2006 Kidney International supplement focuses on PD

    Is survival better on PD or HD? What factors predict PD success? What are best practices in PD catheter placement? Does use of biocompatible PD solution reduce peritonitis? Learn the answers to these and many other key PD questions in the November 2006 supplement of KI. (For kidney professionals who don't subscribe to Kidney International, we've compiled the links to all of the abstracts from the special supplement on PD (November 2006). You can find them below.

    Note to dialyzors: Kidney International is a medical journal for professionals. Feel free to read the abstracts—and please write and let us know if there is information you think we should focus on for a future "Life@Home" article. We'd love to hear from you!

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Matching home dialysis to lifestyle

    A "continuum home program concept" described in a new article would help people with kidney failure continue their lifestyles with dialysis—rather than disrupt them with treatment. The aim is for a continuous flow of services from education to treatment choice, dialysis access, and option changes when needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

    Tags: Chronic kidney disease

  • MYTHBUSTERS: microwaving PD fluid does NOT create glucose degradation products (GDPs)

    While the belief persists that microwaving PD bags creates harmful GDPs when sugars are caramelized, the literature does not bear this out:

    GDPs are a concern with PD fluid, but these are created when the fluid is manufactured, not when it is heated by the user. Of course, "hot spots" are still a concern. Anyone using a microwave to heat PD fluid should flip the bag from side to side to mix the contents well and use a thermometer strip to reduce the risk of burns.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • Does dialysis time matter? YES!

    Perhaps if in-center folks got more HD, they would see that they feel better—and think about home. Per Drs. Lacson and Lazarus from Fresenius, "Compelling rationale and recent outcome data support use of longer Td [dialysis time]...Until such time that results from prospective randomized trials are available, we believe that physicians should prescribe and exert all efforts to convince thrice-weekly hemodialysis patients to accept 4 h as minimum Td."

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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  • PD doesn't zap your heart

    "Myocardial stunning" occurs in HD due to brief periods of not enough blood flow to the heart muscle. Over time, as this happens over and over, it can cause heart damage. In a small study (just 10 people') looking at heart muscles, PD exchanges did not reduce blood flow to the heart—so, no stunning occurred.

    Read the abstract » | (added 2011-02-24)

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