Journal Watch - Mortality

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  1. 87 people on nocturnal home HD for 12 years had just 30% the mortality of standard HD

    How does survival of people on nightly home HD compare to those in the USRDS? A single-center study of 87 people who got 40±6 hours a week of HD found that 79% lived 5 years, and 64% lived for 10 years—a mortality rate just 30% of the USRDS average. Higher levels of education and more hours of dialysis were the only factors independently linked with survival.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/25/2011)

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  2. Travel time to HD predicts HRQOL, adherence, & death

    A new paper from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns (DOPPS) study of 20,994 patients reports that patents whose one-way travel to HD was longer than 60 minutes had significantly higher mortality and lower quality of life. Patients noted, "I feel as if it rules all my time." The authors suggest home dialysis as an option for those who live far from the nearest center.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  3. New study finds better survival with short daily home hemo

    Compared to USRDS survival figures for conventional (3 times a week) in-center hemo, 117 people using short daily home hemo had a significantly lower standardized mortality rate, found a study by Drs. Blagg, Kjellstrand, Ting, and Young.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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  4. November 2006 Kidney International supplement focuses on PD

    Is survival better on PD or HD? What factors predict PD success? What are best practices in PD catheter placement? Does use of biocompatible PD solution reduce peritonitis? Learn the answers to these and many other key PD questions in the November 2006 supplement of KI. (For kidney professionals who don't subscribe to Kidney International, we've compiled the links to all of the abstracts from the special supplement on PD (November 2006). You can find them below.

    Note to dialyzors: Kidney International is a medical journal for professionals. Feel free to read the abstracts—and please write and let us know if there is information you think we should focus on for a future "Life@Home" article. We'd love to hear from you!

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/24/2011)

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