Journal Watch

  1. Remote Monitoring in PD May Catch Problems Early and Reduce Costs

    A simulation study using 12 patient profiles has determined that the ability to obtain clinical treatment information from PD could avoid the use of home and ER visits and hospital stays by identifying problems early, saving an estimated $7,088 to $23,364 across Italy, Germany, and the U.S. Read the abstract.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/13/2017)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease, Economics, End Stage Renal Disease, Peritoneal Dialysis, Remote Therapy Management, Telemedicine

  2. Risk Factors for Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis

    EPS is a rare but devastating complication of PD. Among a series of 703 PD patients in Japan between 1980 and 2015, 6.3% developed EPS. Identified risk factors included a history of longer-duration peritonitis and longer time on PD, while use of biocompatible PD fluid reduced the risk. Read the abstract.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/13/2017)

    Tags: Biocompatible Peritoneal Dialysis Fluid, Dialysate To Plasma Creatinine (D/P Cr) Ratio By Peritoneal Equilibration (Pet), Peritoneal Dialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis Duration, Peritonitis

  3. Urgent-start PD in Brazil

    In a prospective study, 51 patients who needed dialysis urgently began peritoneal dialysis instead of hemodialysis. Even with high-volume dialysate used less than 72 hours after catheter placement (on alternate days in the dialysis clinic), the option was feasible and safe. Read the abstract.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/13/2017)

    Tags: Acute Peritoneal Dialysis, Unplanned Peritoneal Dialysis, Urgent Start Dialysis, Urgent Start Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Iron-based Binder Safe and Effective in PD

    A study conducted with 84 PD patients compared sucroferric oxyhydroxide (n=56) to sevelamer (n=28). After a year, both groups had serum phosphate levels within the target range. The iron-based binder required fewer pills per day and resulted in fewer adverse events. Read the abstract.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/13/2017)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis; Phosphate Binder, Sevelamer Carbonate, Sucroferric Oxyhydroxide

  5. Views of Patients vs. MDs Re: Important Dialysis Outcomes

    An international 3-round Delphi survey that started with 202 patients and care partners and 979 renal professionals aimed to generate a consensus-based prioritized list of core outcomes for HD trials. Not surprisingly, patient/care partner priorities differed dramatically from those of professionals: patients largely valued quality of life outcomes, while professionals focused on clinical ones.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/13/2017)

    Tags: What Is The Best Dialysis Option For Me, Making Dialysis Better

  6. More CMS Incentives Needed to Boost Home Dialysis

    More CMS Incentives Needed to Boost Home Dialysis Have changes in the ESRD Prospective Payment System (“bundle”) designed to increase the use of home dialysis been successful? A new analysis of USRDS data from 2006 to 2013 found that bundling injectable medications and paying for home training did move the needle a bit—but not enough. Compared to patients with other insurance who had a 4.1% increase in home dialysis during this period, Medicare beneficiaries had a non-significant 5.8% rise.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/13/2017)

    Tags: Education Issues: For Patients And Professionals, Choosing The Right Path Through ‘The System’

  7. The Impact of AGEs on the Gut Microbiome in PD

    The Impact of AGEs on the Gut Microbiome in PD Advanced glycation endpoints (AGEs) cause inflammation and are linked with heart disease. A new PLoS One paper reports on a pilot trial of 20 PD patients who routinely ate a high-AGE diet. Ten were randomized to eat as usual, while 10 had their meals AGE-restricted for a month. Gut bacteria analysis found major shifts in the experimental group that could have clinical importance.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/13/2017)

    Tags: Education Issues: For Patients And Professionals, Fistulas, Grafts And Catheters (Including Pd)

  8. Obesity and PD Catheter Function

    It is a common belief that obesity is a contraindication to PD—but a new study of 231 patients who were demographically similar except for weight found otherwise. Compared to normal weight patients, those who were overweight or obese had no signficant differences in catheter dysfunction or complications—regardless of the placement technique used.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/12/2017)

    Tags: Education Issues: For Patients And Professionals, Fistulas, Grafts And Catheters (Including Pd)

  9. Why Do Patients Think PD is Underused?

    A survey of 920 HD patients in Saudi Arabia found that lack of appropriate counseling and education by nephrologists was an important reason why they did not choose PD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/12/2017)

    Tags: Education Issues: For Patients And Professionals

  10. Bone Mineral Balance in Short Daily HD: A Cautionary Tale

    A new case report suggests that bone mineral balance may need extra attention for those doing short daily HD. A patient who had multiple fractures and bone pain severe enough to require a wheelchair for more than a year was found on biopsy to have osteomalacia, likely due to chronically low levels of serum phosphorus and calcium. Increasing these minerals in the dialysate enabled the patient to leave the wheelchair and walk pain-free.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/15/2017)

    Tags: Education Issues: For Patients And Professionals